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What is quiet quitting? quiet quitting work trend taking over TikTok

What is quiet quitting? quiet quitting work trend taking over TikTok

What is quiet quitting? quiet quitting work trend taking over TikTok

According to a new workplace trend called “quiet quitting,” which is trending on TikTok, employees set clear work-life boundaries to reduce stress, but they do so without actually leaving their jobs, despite what the name might imply.

More than 3.9 million people have watched videos on TikTok about the new trend of quiet quitting, and articles from The Wall Street Journal, The Guardian, and other websites have also been written about it. Hundreds of people who have kept quiet about leaving their jobs are now speaking out about how they are working harder to maintain a healthy work-life balance and less on exceeding expectations outside of their job descriptions while continuing to work at their current positions.

According to Allison Peck, a career coach with more than 400,000 followers on TikTok, people are no longer going above and beyond, sacrificing their mental and physical health for their employers. They are working as they are paid to.

What is being said about quitting quietly?

Videos with the hashtag #QuietQuitting include workplace musings on turning off your computer at 5 o’clock and spending more time with family, as well as others who quip that working is the definition of quiet quitting.

Isn’t that just referred to as “working”? As a full-time software developer, baobao.farm identified herself as a TikTok user. “Like, doing your job properly, with a healthy boundary?” she questioned.

In a video explaining how quiet quitting can be used in teaching careers, TikTok user millennialmsfrizz said, “Quiet quitting means that when somebody asks you to do something that’s not in your contract, you don’t do it.”

Quietly quitting, according to TikToker resumeaddict, “includes not doing the job of two to three people — you know, stuff like that?”

Peck wishes the practise had a different name; detractors of the trend refer to it as a “recipe for disaster” or “shooting yourself in the foot.”

“I wish it had a different name because you’re not giving up. You are looking after yourself, Peck said to TODAY. You’re cruising. You’re kind of cautiously coasting.

Who engages in silent quitting?

Polling indicates that people of all ages share similar attitudes toward being engaged at work, even though the majority of those speaking out about quiet quitting on TikTok are younger.

According to a Gallup survey conducted earlier this year, only 32% of workers are currently engaged, down from 36% in 2020. The first annual decline in engagement in more than a decade occurred between 2020 and 2021, according to Gallup.

The generations polled included Gen X, Gen Z, older millennials, and baby boomers, all of whom said their engagement levels ranged from 31% to 33%.

Employees who worked from home or on-site had higher levels of engagement, according to the survey, at 37% as opposed to 29% for those who worked in an office or on-site.

What can employers do about quitting quietly?

To combat quiet quitting, Jim Harter, chief scientist of workplace and well-being at Gallup, told TODAY that it all starts at the top.

Employees who worked from home or on-site had higher levels of engagement, according to the survey, at 37% as opposed to 29% for those who worked in an office or on-site.

What can employers do about quitting quietly?

To combat quiet quitting, Jim Harter, chief scientist of workplace and well-being at Gallup, told TODAY that it all starts at the top.

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